Djandrew Unchandrew

heya! i'm andrew and this is my personal blog. i am cis, he//him pronouns. i go to mcad for comic art and i actually make stuff sometimes! feel free to check out my art blog in the link below. if you want an assortment of bullshit i find funny or entertaining, stick around here. also i play video games and blog about it incoherently sometimes.

joekeatinge:

Happy 97th Birthday, Jack Kirby.

Your party favor is 170 of his double page spreads

4 hours ago on August 29th | J | 1,581 notes
4 hours ago on August 29th | J | 48,110 notes
mariopartylegacy:

Enter the Shy Guy.

mariopartylegacy:

Enter the Shy Guy.

4 hours ago on August 29th | J | 1,837 notes
6 hours ago on August 28th | J | 229 notes
willlaren:

"The Bone Spy"

willlaren:

"The Bone Spy"

6 hours ago on August 28th | J | 1,762 notes

Aug. 28 5:41 pm

justice4mikebrown:

6 hours ago on August 28th | J | 16,510 notes
default album art
Song: Solid Snake
Artist: Psycosis
Played: 31,205 times.
6 hours ago on August 28th | J | 4,788 notes
Tagged as: #music 
beekirby:

Shadow the Hedgehog (video game)

beekirby:

Shadow the Hedgehog (video game)

12 hours ago on August 28th | J | 9,846 notes
garfieldminusgarfield:

G-G the book - G-G on Facebook - G-G on Twitter

garfieldminusgarfield:

G-G the book - G-G on Facebook - G-G on Twitter

13 hours ago on August 28th | J | 1,261 notes

ozkit:

Another theory about why villagers’ shirts always end up sleeveless, this time in Jock Edition (and in color)!  Companion theory here.

13 hours ago on August 28th | J | 2,227 notes

chromatographic:

tacticalnymphomania:

nellachronism:

loveforalia:

You know you had a Catholic upbringing when somebody says “May the force be with you” and your instant reaction is to reply with “And also with you”.

Lift up your lightsabers.

We lift them up to the lord.

image

Let us give thanks to the Force our guide.

It is right to give the Force thanks and praise.

15 hours ago on August 28th | J | 69,781 notes
thisiseverydayracism:

As darkness fell on Canfield Drive on August 9, a makeshift memorial sprang up in the middle of the street where Michael Brown’s body had been sprawled in plain view for more than four hours. Flowers and candles were scattered over the bloodstains on the pavement. Someone had affixed a stuffed animal to a streetlight pole a few yards away. Neighborhood residents and others were gathering, many of them upset and angry.
Soon, police vehicles reappeared, including from the St. Louis County Police Department, which had taken control of the investigation. Several officers emerged with dogs. What happened next, according to several sources, was emblematic of what has inflamed the city of Ferguson, Missouri, ever since the unarmed 18-year-old was gunned down: An officer on the street let the dog he was controlling urinate on the memorial site.
The incident was related to me separately by three state and local officials who worked with the community in the immediate aftermath of the shooting. One confirmed that he interviewed an eyewitness, a young woman, and pressed her on what exactly she saw. “She said that the officer just let the dog pee on it,” that official told me. “She was very distraught about it.” The identity of the officer who handled the dog and the agency he was with remain unclear.
Candles and flowers marking the spot where Brown died were soon run over by police vehicles.
The day brought other indignities for Brown’s family, and the community. Missouri state Rep. Sharon Pace, whose district includes the neighborhood where the shooting occurred, told me she went to the scene that afternoon to comfort the parents, who were blocked by police from approaching their son’s body. Pace purchased some tea lights for the family, and around 7 p.m. she joined Brown’s mother, Lesley McSpadden, and others as they placed the candles and sprinkled flowers on the ground where Brown had died. “They spelled out his initials with rose petals over the bloodstains,” Pace recalled.
By then, police had prohibited all vehicles from entering Canfield Drive except for their own. Soon the candles and flowers had been smashed, after police drove over them.
"That made people in the crowd mad," Pace said, "and it made me mad." Some residents began walking in front of police vehicles at the end of the block to prevent them from driving in.
More: http://m.motherjones.com/politics/2014/08/ferguson-st-louis-police-tactics-dogs-michael-brown

thisiseverydayracism:

As darkness fell on Canfield Drive on August 9, a makeshift memorial sprang up in the middle of the street where Michael Brown’s body had been sprawled in plain view for more than four hours. Flowers and candles were scattered over the bloodstains on the pavement. Someone had affixed a stuffed animal to a streetlight pole a few yards away. Neighborhood residents and others were gathering, many of them upset and angry.

Soon, police vehicles reappeared, including from the St. Louis County Police Department, which had taken control of the investigation. Several officers emerged with dogs. What happened next, according to several sources, was emblematic of what has inflamed the city of Ferguson, Missouri, ever since the unarmed 18-year-old was gunned down: An officer on the street let the dog he was controlling urinate on the memorial site.

The incident was related to me separately by three state and local officials who worked with the community in the immediate aftermath of the shooting. One confirmed that he interviewed an eyewitness, a young woman, and pressed her on what exactly she saw. “She said that the officer just let the dog pee on it,” that official told me. “She was very distraught about it.” The identity of the officer who handled the dog and the agency he was with remain unclear.

Candles and flowers marking the spot where Brown died were soon run over by police vehicles.

The day brought other indignities for Brown’s family, and the community. Missouri state Rep. Sharon Pace, whose district includes the neighborhood where the shooting occurred, told me she went to the scene that afternoon to comfort the parents, who were blocked by police from approaching their son’s body. Pace purchased some tea lights for the family, and around 7 p.m. she joined Brown’s mother, Lesley McSpadden, and others as they placed the candles and sprinkled flowers on the ground where Brown had died. “They spelled out his initials with rose petals over the bloodstains,” Pace recalled.

By then, police had prohibited all vehicles from entering Canfield Drive except for their own. Soon the candles and flowers had been smashed, after police drove over them.

"That made people in the crowd mad," Pace said, "and it made me mad." Some residents began walking in front of police vehicles at the end of the block to prevent them from driving in.

More: http://m.motherjones.com/politics/2014/08/ferguson-st-louis-police-tactics-dogs-michael-brown

15 hours ago on August 28th | J | 1,629 notes
16 hours ago on August 28th | J | 7,414 notes

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Police brutality in Ferguson costs taxpayers millions.

16 hours ago on August 28th | J | 27,747 notes
mcad:

Meet the 2014 Orientation Crew!

mcad:

Meet the 2014 Orientation Crew!

16 hours ago on August 28th | J | 51 notes